Materials

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The many materials to be found or utilized in the Lost Lands.

Cloth

barkcloth

Cloth woven from the fibrous bark of certain trees, such as cedar. An iconic choice for survivalists and bushcrafters.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 1

canvas

A heavy and durable plain-woven fabric useful for making sails, backpacks, tents, and other cloth items that need to stand up to wear and tear.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 2

cotton

A light and soft cloth woven from the bolls of the cotton plant.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 2

linen

A light, absorbant, and fast-drying material made from the fibers of the flax plant. A popular garment material in warmer climates, though some complain about its tendency to wrinkle.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 1

oilcloth

Linen cloth treated with linseed oil to become water-resistant. Useful for keeping the rain off with a coat, cloak, or umbrella.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 1
  • Water-resistant

rimeveil

A cotton-like material with a natural snowy-white color. Harvested from the bolls of a low-growing plant that somehow manages to thrive in cold temperatures.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 2

thornleaf

A hardy smaller bush - designated a weed by many - known for its spiny leaves and the discomfort they inflict upon foragers and travelers. Popular among bushcrafters for its fibrous stalks which can be painstakingly woven into cordage and cloth.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 1

wool

Fur shorn from wooly animals and woven into a warm textile with manner of practical uses. Those with more sensitive skin may find wool garments to be itchy.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 3

Leather

animal-scale

Scales of certain types of animals layered into a protective (or sometimes merely decorative) material, making it tougher than plain leather.

  • Clothing warmth: 3

fur

The tanned hide of an animal with the fur still intact. Quite warm and thus popular in colder climates, though it can get heavy.

  • Clothing warmth: 4
  • Water-resistant

leather

The tanned hide of an animal with the fur removed. Relatively supple while affording some appreciable protection.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 3
  • Water-resistant

ridgeleather

Leather that has been treated to become stiff and rigid, often used as lighter or lower-quality heavy armor made to turn aside blows as much as absorb their force. The origin of the name "ridgeleather" is lost, though most linguists agree it is likely a simple mutation of the term "rigid leather".

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 3

Lithics

bloodglass

A blood-red glassy material devised by the Nuum that holds an extremely sharp edge but is quite brittle. Impractical for larger or longer pieces, but it provides a peerless cutting edge for smaller axe-heads, spearheads, arrowheads, and knives.

  • Weight: 12
  • Durability: 2
  • Sharpness: +40

flint

A type of stone often found near water sources that have cut through a rock layer. Used since ancient times for primitive knapped tools with serviceable cutting edges such as the heads of axes, spears, and arrows.

  • Weight: 12
  • Durability: 2
  • Sharpness: +2

Metal

bronze

A fairly common alloy of copper and tin that is far stronger than either of its bases individually. Overall tougher than iron but also more malleable, and therefore impractical for some pieces such as particularly long blades.

  • Weight: 9
  • Durability: 7
  • Sharpness: +1

celestium

An exceedingly rare silvery-white metal that occasionally falls from the sky amidst chunks of rock. As tough as steel and with a very high melting point, it requires specialized tools and methods to work. Its ability to repel nether is legendary, and so it is highly sought by those who hunt nethrim or sorcerers.

  • Weight: 6
  • Durability: 10
  • Sharpness: +2

copper

A common metal with a low melting point yet durable enough to be useful for various tools, weapons, or armor, even if considered too soft to be ideal for such purposes. It remains useful for all manner of other uses in metalworking that don't require too much strength.

  • Weight: 10
  • Durability: 5

fjelbrons

A Giganti-derived alloy similar to bronze and tougher than steel, but quite heavy. Good for durable tools, weapons, and armor for those with the strength to utilize them.

  • Weight: 12
  • Durability: 11

gold

A valuable metal for its aesthetics alone, it has few practical applications and serves largely as a luxury status symbol.

  • Weight: 20
  • Durability: 2

iron

A versatile metal quite useful on its own and also used in a wide variety of alloys with various properties. Particularly notable for its ability to repel nether.

  • Weight: 8
  • Durability: 6

riversteel

A form of steel of Khaldean origin whose method of creation is not commonly known. It gets its Common name from the whorled patterns on the metal's surface reminiscent of the waters of a river. Sturdier than common steel and able to hold a keener edge, it is highly sought after for edged weapons.

  • Weight: 8
  • Durability: 11
  • Sharpness: +7

steel

An alloy of iron that is very sturdy. Becoming increasingly common in modern times, it is at the top of the 'standard' tier of metals when it come to sturdy construction, tools, and gear. It retains a small fraction of the nether-repellant properties of iron.

  • Weight: 8
  • Durability: 10
  • Sharpness: +2

sunsteel

An alloy derived by Viali smiths to make more efficient use of limited quantities of celestium. Significantly tougher than steel and able to hold a keen edge, it retains much of celestium's ability to repel nether.

  • Weight: 7
  • Durability: 13
  • Sharpness: +3

tin

A light and malleable silvery metal with faint golden hue. Tin is mostly used in creating bronze alloys. Useless for tools and gear in its native form.

Wicker

bluestem

An abundant tall grass found in the Bluestem Plains region near Shadgard, getting its name from the blue (or occasionally purple) tinge of its lower stems. Often used as fodder for livestock feed or for wicker-weaving.

  • Can be dyed
  • Clothing warmth: 0.5

Wood

alder

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0

amberwood

The wood of the amberwood tree exhibits a pleasant warm golden hue valued for its aesthetic alone, as it is not otherwise particularly useful over other types of wood. The amberwood tree excretes unique nodules known as "amberpearls" with culinary and medical concoction uses.

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 5
  • Bow Power: -2

ash

A quality wood for bow-making due to its above-average strength and elasticity.

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 11
  • Bow Power: +0.5

beech

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0

cedar

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 5
  • Bow Power: -2

chestnut

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0

elm

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 13
  • Bow Power: +0

fir

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 5
  • Bow Power: -2

gaelwood

A rare tree from the Faewyr homeland of Tyr-Gwyrd. With proper treatment and processing it can produce bows of extraordinary durability and power. Bogvaskr himself is often said to wield a bow made from gaelwood.

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 12
  • Bow Power: +2.5

maple

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0

oak

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0

pine

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 5
  • Bow Power: -2

rowan

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0.5

spruce

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 5
  • Bow Power: -2

teak

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 9
  • Bow Power: +0

walnut

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 10
  • Bow Power: +0

yew

Easily the most popular practically-obtainable wood for bow-making. It can be hazardous to obtain, however: harvesters are often reported to suffer sickness after felling or processing the trees.

  • Can be dyed
  • Bow Durability: 12
  • Bow Power: +1.5